For younger children

Cbeebies  is puzzles quizzes, games and songs for wee ones to join in with.

CBeebies bedtime stories are read by lots of fun and famous people.

If you have children working at KS1, this channel is a gem. With weekly episodes spanning about 30 minutes each, WordWorld is produced in such a way that words are “the stars of the show”. Almost like a show-and-tell activity, objects are built with the letters that make up the word they represent. A great way to encourage reading, writing and spelling.

Watch WordWorld here

The child-friendly version of the immensely popular network National Geographic. Nat Geo Kids features videos about animals, science, culture and much more. The videos are short but informative, and there’s loads for your child to choose from to help feed their curiosity.

Watch National Geographic Kids here

Everyone loves Sesame Street, right? It’s made by the Sesame Workshop, a nonprofit education organisation that produces multiple educational programmes for children, and has been a children’s TV staple for more than 50 years. The show’s YouTube channel is packed with videos designed to help your child learn essential life skills – everything from tying a shoelace to caring for ourselves and others – plus plenty of educational content that may well be useful if your kids are working at KS1. More than just a teaching aid, though, it’s also guaranteed to bring a smile to every face.

Watch Sesame Street here

Describing itself as “Science with a side of awesome”, Crash Course Kids is a fantastic way to engage your younger children in the exciting world of science. Covering topics ranging from habitats to space to chemical reactions, the producers of this show have one goal: making science fun. Whilst it is an American channel, much of the content will apply to any children currently working at KS2 – and all kids who have an interest in how the world works.

Watch Crash Course Kids here

For older learners

BBC Bitesize has learning activities for every school and pre-school age and stage.  You can also match to the Scottish curriculum.

CBBC has games, activities programmes for older children.

Khan Academy is a nonprofit organisation whose mission is to provide free education worldwide. Its channel features expertly produced content on a wide range of school subjects, as well as advice videos on how to manage exam anxiety and procrastination, to name but a few. More recently, the channel has been offering livestream “office hours”, where parents, teachers and students can submit questions via YouTube’s live chat.

Watch Khan Academy here

You’ve probably already heard of TED Talks, a collection of topical videos from expert and influential speakers. TED–Ed is an extension to TED Talks, with a commitment to “creating lessons worth sharing”, straight from your device. With a library full of expertly produced content from collaborations between educators and animators, TED–Ed celebrates education worldwide – and is a great way for older children to challenge their knowledge.

Watch TED–Ed here

The child-friendly version of the immensely popular network National Geographic. Nat Geo Kids features videos about animals, science, culture and much more. The videos are short but informative, and there’s loads for your child to choose from to help feed their curiosity.

Watch National Geographic Kids here

For parents and carers

Free apps

These apps are for literacy and numeracy learning. In most, the difficulty level can be adjusted. They can be downloaded and played when no wifi is available. Search the title on your iPad or tablet.

Paying for apps

If you are part of the Digital Families programme you can ask to receive an iTunes card to enable you to access a wider range of apps. Find out more about Digital Families by contacting step@ed.ac.uk